Home » Roles of glutamine in the body

Roles of glutamine in the body

Roles of glutamine:

L-Glutamine is a vital amino acid that is required by every muscle in the body, and is one of the most important building blocks in forming the proteins that maintain cellular health and tissue repair. L-Glutamine is found in varying amounts in most meat and fish as well as, to a small extent, in vegetables and pulses. Anyone involved in high intensity training programmes designed for muscle growth or increasing strength, are advised to use L-Glutamine as a dietary supplement to boost their intake.

L-Glutamine is a semi essential amino acid that the body is able to produce in small amounts; however the majority of it must come from the diet. It is required for the growth of cells in the muscles, and also plays an important role in repairing damaged tissues and in the healing process.

  • Glutamine contains one atom of nitrogen as an amide and another atom of nitrogen as an amine and it transports and delivers nitrogen to cells in quantities that are toxic as free ammonium.
  • Glutamine amide nitrogen is used in the synthesis of the vitamins NAD and NADP, purine nucleotides, CTP from UTP and asparagine. Nitrogen initially stored in glutamine can also be used to produce carbamyl phosphate for the synthesis of pyrimidines.
  • Glutamine is a precursor of glutamate, a key amino acid used for the transamination of alpha ketoacids to form other alpha amino acids
  • When glucose levels are low and energy demands are high, cells can metabolize amino acids for energy. Glutamine is one of the most readily available amino acids for use as an energy source and it is a major source of energy for many rapidly dividing cell types in vitro.
  • Glutamine contains one atom of nitrogen as an amide and another atom of nitrogen as an amine and it transports and delivers nitrogen to cells in quantities that are toxic as free ammonium.
  • Glutamine amide nitrogen is used in the synthesis of the vitamins NAD and NADP, purine nucleotides, CTP from UTP and asparagine. Nitrogen initially stored in glutamine can also be used to produce carbamyl phosphate for the synthesis of pyrimidines.
  • Glutamine is a precursor of glutamate, a key amino acid used for the transamination of alpha ketoacids to form other alpha amino acids.
  • When glucose levels are low and energy demands are high, cells can metabolize amino acids for energy. Glutamine is one of the most readily available amino acids for use as an energy source and it is a major source of energy for many rapidly dividing cell types in vitro.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: